Start Time

9:00

venerdì, Dicembre 20, 2019

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End Time

18:00

venerdì, Dicembre 20, 2019

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Address

Department of Sociology, 3rd floor

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Workshop

Visualizing Science

Elena Canadelli

09.00 – 13.00
VISUAL SCIENCE: HOW SCIENCE USES IMAGES
Images play a pivotal role in science today as in past centuries. Visual imagination is a central element of scientific practice as shown by different examples, from Andreas Vesalius to Robert Hooker, including the group of scientists that recently has obtained the image of a black hole. Scientists have used figures and representations (photographs, diagrams, models, natural history illustrations, etc) in many ways over the centuries: for knowledge-making, representation, education, dissemination or explanation. The lesson will explore this topic addressing some relevant case studies in the field.

Elena Milani

14.00-16.00
THE IMPACT OF DIGITAL MEDIA ON DIGITAL COMMUNICATION OF SCIENCE
Digital communication is becoming more visual: images and videos are regularly uploaded, downloaded, edited, re-contextualised, shared and re-shared on the Internet and social media outlets. Though these visuals are widespread online, we still lack tools to discern their accuracy, authenticity and potential interpretations. This impacts science communication in particular, as the wrong or doctored image can influence public perception of scientific controversies (e.g. vaccinations). This lesson will provide examples and case studies of the factors to consider when interpreting and choosing online images for science communication.

Tommaso Rosi

16.30-18.00
BEST PRACTICES AND POTENTIAL PITFALLS IN THE VISUAL DISPLAY OF QUANTITATIVE INFORMATION
In this lesson theory and practice in the design of data graphics will be discussed. This comprehends analyzing the logic of depicting quantitative evidence, and reasoning about how to design, edit and improve graphics we use to present data. Graphical integrity and graphical deception will also be examined, as communicators can skew how data is perceived, whether by using some well-known techniques or simply by not being proficient in these topics. This includes the analysis of sources of deception and the distinction between design variation and data variation.

Speakers

Elena Canadelli, Elena Milani, Tommaso Rosi

Elena Canadelli is Assistant Professor in History of Science at the University of Padova, she is a Historian of Science interested in visual studies in science, science museum studies, cultures of natural history, the history of evolutionary thought and the relationship between science and popular culture.

Elena Milani is a research fellow for the European Project RETHINK, and member of the Science Communication Unit at the University of West of England. She is currently involved in mapping the European digital science communication landscape and identifying gaps and best practices in online communication of science.

Tommaso Rosi is a post-doctoral research fellow in physics at the Laboratory of Physical Science Communication of Trento, he is specialized in the use of new technologies in Physics Education.